Barriers to Sexual Assault Bystander Intervention: Predicting Bystander Behavior, Attitudes, and Efficacy Across Sex

This study was intended to increase our understanding of how barriers to bystander intervention effects student’s likelihood of intervening to stop sexual assault. It was found that men with more barriers to intervention were less likely to step in a stop the risky situation. Additionally, those with less barriers to intervention were more likely to express intention to intervene, but this was stronger in women. Finally, those who experienced more  barriers to bystander intervention were less confident in their ability to intervene and stop the sexual assault, but this was more true in men than women.

Read all about it here

Bizal, Kyle; Bailey, Lytle; Brumbaugh, Taylor; Hansmeier, Haley; Carlson, Hannah; Otto, Elizabeth; Kumar,
Shaina; Gervais, Sarah; and DiLillo, David, “Barriers to Sexual Assault Bystander Intervention: Predicting
Bystander Behavior, Attitudes, and Efficacy Across Sex” (2020). UCARE Research Products. 183.
https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/ucareresearch/183

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